1. Martin Luther King
       
     
2. Mahatma Gandhi
       
     
3. Anne Frank
       
     
4. Jesse Owens
       
     
5. Nelson Mandela
       
     
6. Marjane Satrapi
       
     
7. Malala Yousafzai
       
     
8. Rigoberta Menchú
       
     
9. Mafalda (Quino)
       
     
10. Nina Simone
       
     
11. Jean-Michel Basquiat
       
     
12. Sidney Poitier
       
     
13. Mother Teresa
       
     
14. Abraham Lincoln
       
     
15. Charlie Chaplin
       
     
16. Louis Armstrong
       
     
1. Martin Luther King
       
     
1. Martin Luther King

"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today."

2. Mahatma Gandhi
       
     
2. Mahatma Gandhi

"You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty"

3. Anne Frank
       
     
3. Anne Frank

"I keep my ideals, because in spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart" 

4. Jesse Owens
       
     
4. Jesse Owens

"I wanted no part of politics. And I wasn't in Berlin to compete against any one athlete. The purpose of the Olympics, anyway, was to do your best. As I'd learned long ago from Charles Riley, the only victory that counts is the one over yourself."

5. Nelson Mandela
       
     
5. Nelson Mandela

While he was imprisoned, Mandela kept his aim up by reading and rereading this Ernest Henley outstanding poem: Invictus:

"Out of the night that covers me,
Black as the pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance
I have not winced nor cried aloud.
Under the bludgeonings of chance
My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the horror of the shade,
And yet the menace of the years
Finds and shall find me unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate:
I am the captain of my soul"

6. Marjane Satrapi
       
     
6. Marjane Satrapi

"It is dangerous when you start calling people from one part of the world terrorists or fanatic, and you reduce them to some abstract notion. If evil has a geographical place, and if the evil has a name, that is the beginning of fascism. Real life is not this way. You have fanatics and narrow-minded people everywhere."
 

7. Malala Yousafzai
       
     
7. Malala Yousafzai

“Let us pick up our books and our pens,” I said. “They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world.”

8. Rigoberta Menchú
       
     
8. Rigoberta Menchú

"Let there be freedom for the Indians, wherever they may be in the American Continent or elsewhere in the world, because while they are alive, a glow of hope will be alive as well as a true concept of life."
 

9. Mafalda (Quino)
       
     
9. Mafalda (Quino)

"Lo malo de la gran familia humana es que todos quieren ser el padre"

10. Nina Simone
       
     
10. Nina Simone

"I tell you what freedom is to me: no fear"

11. Jean-Michel Basquiat
       
     
11. Jean-Michel Basquiat

"The black person is the protagonist in most of my paintings. I realized that I didn't see many paintings with black people in them."
 

12. Sidney Poitier
       
     
12. Sidney Poitier

"I was the only black person on the set. It was unusual for me to be in a circumstance in which every move I made was tantamount to representation of 18 million people."
 

13. Mother Teresa
       
     
13. Mother Teresa

"If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other."

14. Abraham Lincoln
       
     
14. Abraham Lincoln

"Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves"

15. Charlie Chaplin
       
     
15. Charlie Chaplin

"I’m sorry, but I don’t want to be an emperor. That’s not my business. I don’t want to rule or conquer anyone. I should like to help everyone - if possible - Jew, Gentile - black man - white. We all want to help one another. Human beings are like that. We want to live by each other’s happiness - not by each other’s misery. We don’t want to hate and despise one another. In this world there is room for everyone. And the good earth is rich and can provide for everyone. The way of life can be free and beautiful, but we have lost the way.

Greed has poisoned men’s souls, has barricaded the world with hate, has goose-stepped us into misery and bloodshed. We have developed speed, but we have shut ourselves in. Machinery that gives abundance has left us in want. Our knowledge has made us cynical. Our cleverness, hard and unkind. We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery we need humanity. More than cleverness we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost…."

 

The Great Dictator (1940)

16. Louis Armstrong
       
     
16. Louis Armstrong

"The key word is “we’re.” Armstrong grew up poor and powerless, and he never forgot it. Despite his fame, he understood the repercussions for a community after the celebrity savior jets home. “I don’t socialize with the top dogs of society after a dance or concert,” he said in a 1964 profile in Ebony. “These same society people may go around the corner and lynch a Negro.”